ashes, ashes, we all fall down

Jul 23

A boy sprawled next to me on the bus, elbows out, knee pointing sharp into my thigh.
He frowned at me when I uncrossed my legs, unfolded my hands
and splayed out like boys are taught to: all big, loose limbs.
I made sure to jab him in the side with my pretty little sharp purse.
At first he opened his mouth like I expected him to, but instead of speaking up he sat there, quiet, and took it for the whole bus ride.
Like a girl.

Once, a boy said my anger was cute, and he laughed,
and I remember thinking that I should sit there and take it,
because it isn’t ladylike to cause a scene and girls aren’t supposed to raise their voices.
But then he laughed again and all I saw
was my pretty little sharp nails digging into his cheek
before drawing back and making a horribly unladylike fist.
(my teacher informed me later that there is no ladylike way of making a fist.)

When we were both in the principal’s office twenty minutes later
him with a bloody mouth and cheek, me with skinned knuckles,
I tried to explain in words that I didn’t have yet
that I was tired of having my emotions not taken seriously
just because I’m a girl.

Girls are taught: be small, so boys can be big.
Don’t take up any more space than absolutely necessary.
Be small and smooth with soft edges
and hold in the howling when they touch you and it hurts:
the sandpaper scrape of their body hair that we would be shamed for having,
the greedy hands that press too hard and too often take without asking permission.

Girls are taught: be quiet and unimposing and oh so small
when they heckle you with their big voices from the window of a car,
because it’s rude to scream curse words back at them, and they’d just laugh anyway.
We’re taught to pin on smiles for the boys who jeer at us on the street
who see us as convenient bodies instead of people.

Girls are taught: hush, be hairless and small and soft,
so we sit there and take it and hold in the howling,
pretend to be obedient lapdogs instead of the wolves we are.
We pin pretty little sharp smiles on our faces instead of opening our mouths,
because if we do we get accused of silly women emotions
blowing everything out of proportion with our PMS, we get
condescending pet names and not-so-discreet eyerolls.

Once, I got told I punched like a girl.
I told him, Good. I hope my pretty little sharp rings leave scars.

” — 'My Perfume Doubles As Mace,' theappleppielifestyle. (via theappleppielifestyle)

(Source: kittiezandtittiez, via marimidnight)

Jul 22

iseekum said: Would you call yourself a feminist or an equal rights activist? Is there any reason you'd choose one over the other? I got into a debate with a friend and grew curious, since you're the most vocal feminist lady I follow. Also, hi!

gailsimone:

The whole problem with this kind of question is that to answer it, I have to accept a definition of feminism that I don’t agree with, that isn’t reality-based at all. 

This is what the passive aggressive types and the anti-feminists always want, they want you to acknowledge the warped, nonsensical viewpoint they have, because it validates them, it coddles them. It’s nothing I choose to take part in, I just think it’s goofy.

There are legitimate things in the history of feminism that are shameful, but those things are not what these people are complaining about. They are complaining about a minority opinion so minute as to barely exist at all. 

Men don’t like it when all men are judged by a minority of jerks, neither do women, neither do feminists. 

What the vast majority of feminists want is fair treatment and equal opportunity, but that is such a universally understandable goal that huge numbers of creeps have spend untold resources trying to make it about every other possible permutation. Responding at all might be a little more than such attempts deserve, but every once in a while, you have to clean the damn catbox or the stink gets unbearable.

Edited to add: I am not saying the questioner is one of those people, I am saying that is how is often phrased.

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Jul 13

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Jul 08

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Jul 07

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A Startling Revelation -

cuteinsanity:

So, being a fan of the Teen Titans cartoon, I loved a lot of things about it and it matches a lot of my personal headcanon, but one thing I could never get behind was that the Robin that was on the show is Dick Grayson.

image

I know it’s Dick. I know why it’s him. I know that they’ve blatantly…

Talk about foreshadowing!!

Jun 26

[video]

Progress: Washington’s Health Insurance Policies Cannot Discriminate! | Transgender Law Center

Jun 22

dduane:

aethalmaer:

ickletayto:

saoili:

thevoyagesofthefdfdanton:

anottershambles:

thebabbagepatch:

ilacktact:

mycosmicreality:

adeyami:

US students will be able to shield themselves during school shootings with the latest in body armour, the Bodyguard Blanket
http://goo.gl/WwvECT
Are fucking kidding me? I have been sitting at home and constantly watching the news after the events of yesterday. For those of you who are wondering, I am a junior at REYNOLDS HIGH SCHOOL! I was there when the shooter kept running in the halls trying to open the doors and get in. I was there in the dark praying and crying while my librarian kept saying ” they’ll have to kill me before they touch my kids” I have known her for three years, her determination to keep us safe broke her heart. Seeing this, that little children need protection in school. Are we sending kids to a battlefield? I have three little brothers ranging from 5-10, and still people have the nerve to speak about the second amendment? Really? I can’t even type anymore. I’m so disgusted and frustrated. When will you realize that it’s important to have gun control? When a shooter is pointing a gun at your child? Is that when you’ll realize that guns aren’t something to be kept around. People say it’s a free country but honesty, this country is more oppressed and diseased than any other country.

Show me ONE instance where gun control and gun free zones prevented school shootings.



The Republic of Ireland has never had a school shooting in its history.
Not. A. Single. One.
Not only is the possession of handguns illegal, we also have a completely unarmed police force. Members of An Garda Síochána are equipped with batons, pepper spray and on the rare occasion, a taser. Detectives carry guns but even then they face massive restrictions on the carrying and use of that gun. The only real-life guns I have ever seen were when I’ve travelled abroad or up North.
Guns kill people. 
They are largely unnecessary and have no place in a civilised society.
End of story.

It’s worth noting that until 1927 (IIRC) it was common for people in Ireland to own firearms. Rifles, shotguns and pistols. Like, loads of them. All over the country. And then the government was like, “Okay. War over. Time to get rid of the weapons…” and it more or less worked. Around the time of the troubles they cracked down again and made even fewer guns legal.

We do occasionally have shootings here. Proving that, yeah, ‘the bad guys’ can get guns. But they’re not the same kind of ‘bad guys’ who go shooting up schools or hunting down women or whatever. Individuals shoot individuals here. And even that is rare.
Any argument along the lines of ‘if guns were illegal there’d still be mass shootings AND we wouldn’t be able to defend ourselves against them’ seems to come from the USA’s peculiar insularity.
I think the Onion said it best:
http://www.theonion.com/articles/no-way-to-prevent-this-says-only-nation-where-this,36131/

When one of my friends visited me from the states this year he was freaked out by shops called ‘cash and carry’, assuming they referred to gun shops that would sell you guns for cash, with no delay.. When I explained they were wholesale shops selling food/toiletries etc he was perturbed by the idea that we don’t have gun shops..

In Ireland any shootings would get full page news. Heck, if a drug dealer stabs another drug dealer in a deal gone bad in a really rough area, that gets mentioned in the news.

This bears repeating / reblogging as regards Ireland. With the addition: while citizens can hold firearms legally, to get a license for a gun (most frequently a rifle or shotgun: handgun licensing is tightly controlled) you have to prove why you need one and satisfy various background checks into your mental health, character, etc. (The commonest reason for applying for a license is that you’re a landowner who wants to shoot over the owned land, either for sport/food or for pest control purposes.)  If you want a gun for target-shooting purposes, you must be a member of a Garda-approved gun club or you will not be granted a license. Automatic weapons are prohibited: semi-automatics are tightly restricted. (Interestingly, the legislation also applies to crossbows. Compound bows and recurves are exempt, though.) 
A good rundown on Irish gun law and stats concerning gun crime, etc, is here.

dduane:

aethalmaer:

ickletayto:

saoili:

thevoyagesofthefdfdanton:

anottershambles:

thebabbagepatch:

ilacktact:

mycosmicreality:

adeyami:

US students will be able to shield themselves during school shootings with the latest in body armour, the Bodyguard Blanket

http://goo.gl/WwvECT

Are fucking kidding me? I have been sitting at home and constantly watching the news after the events of yesterday. For those of you who are wondering, I am a junior at REYNOLDS HIGH SCHOOL! I was there when the shooter kept running in the halls trying to open the doors and get in. I was there in the dark praying and crying while my librarian kept saying ” they’ll have to kill me before they touch my kids” I have known her for three years, her determination to keep us safe broke her heart. Seeing this, that little children need protection in school. Are we sending kids to a battlefield? I have three little brothers ranging from 5-10, and still people have the nerve to speak about the second amendment? Really? I can’t even type anymore. I’m so disgusted and frustrated. When will you realize that it’s important to have gun control? When a shooter is pointing a gun at your child? Is that when you’ll realize that guns aren’t something to be kept around. People say it’s a free country but honesty, this country is more oppressed and diseased than any other country.

Show me ONE instance where gun control and gun free zones prevented school shootings.

image

The Republic of Ireland has never had a school shooting in its history.

Not. A. Single. One.

Not only is the possession of handguns illegal, we also have a completely unarmed police force. Members of An Garda Síochána are equipped with batons, pepper spray and on the rare occasion, a taser. Detectives carry guns but even then they face massive restrictions on the carrying and use of that gun. The only real-life guns I have ever seen were when I’ve travelled abroad or up North.

Guns kill people. 

They are largely unnecessary and have no place in a civilised society.

End of story.

It’s worth noting that until 1927 (IIRC) it was common for people in Ireland to own firearms. Rifles, shotguns and pistols. Like, loads of them. All over the country. And then the government was like, “Okay. War over. Time to get rid of the weapons…” and it more or less worked. Around the time of the troubles they cracked down again and made even fewer guns legal.

We do occasionally have shootings here. Proving that, yeah, ‘the bad guys’ can get guns. But they’re not the same kind of ‘bad guys’ who go shooting up schools or hunting down women or whatever. Individuals shoot individuals here. And even that is rare.

Any argument along the lines of ‘if guns were illegal there’d still be mass shootings AND we wouldn’t be able to defend ourselves against them’ seems to come from the USA’s peculiar insularity.

I think the Onion said it best:

http://www.theonion.com/articles/no-way-to-prevent-this-says-only-nation-where-this,36131/

When one of my friends visited me from the states this year he was freaked out by shops called ‘cash and carry’, assuming they referred to gun shops that would sell you guns for cash, with no delay.. When I explained they were wholesale shops selling food/toiletries etc he was perturbed by the idea that we don’t have gun shops..

In Ireland any shootings would get full page news. Heck, if a drug dealer stabs another drug dealer in a deal gone bad in a really rough area, that gets mentioned in the news.

This bears repeating / reblogging as regards Ireland. With the addition: while citizens can hold firearms legally, to get a license for a gun (most frequently a rifle or shotgun: handgun licensing is tightly controlled) you have to prove why you need one and satisfy various background checks into your mental health, character, etc. (The commonest reason for applying for a license is that you’re a landowner who wants to shoot over the owned land, either for sport/food or for pest control purposes.)  If you want a gun for target-shooting purposes, you must be a member of a Garda-approved gun club or you will not be granted a license. Automatic weapons are prohibited: semi-automatics are tightly restricted. (Interestingly, the legislation also applies to crossbows. Compound bows and recurves are exempt, though.)

A good rundown on Irish gun law and stats concerning gun crime, etc, is here.

dduane:

Amazing People: I don’t think I’ve ever seen a guy so comprehensively steamrollered. And he SO had it coming.

dduane:

Amazing People: I don’t think I’ve ever seen a guy so comprehensively steamrollered. And he SO had it coming.

(Source: twitter.com)

[video]

elanmagazine:

Arab Women Rising: 35 female entrepreneurs create change in the Middle East and beyond

Women in the Arab world are usually depicted as submissive, oppressed, stay-at-home women who are financially dependent on the men in their lives, either a father or husband.
Overcoming societal pressures and obstacles to create change, these 35 Arab women speak to the startup revolution taking place in the MENA region and the enormous impact, potential and need for women’s economic empowerment. 

Read More | Follow Elan Magazine 

elanmagazine:

Arab Women Rising: 35 female entrepreneurs create change in the Middle East and beyond

Women in the Arab world are usually depicted as submissive, oppressed, stay-at-home women who are financially dependent on the men in their lives, either a father or husband.

Overcoming societal pressures and obstacles to create change, these 35 Arab women speak to the startup revolution taking place in the MENA region and the enormous impact, potential and need for women’s economic empowerment. 

Read More | Follow Elan Magazine 

(via sexgenderbody)